Power of Play In A Child’s Neural Development

The easiest way to make a child smile is to ask him or her – Do you want to play? Playing is something we all associate with our carefree childhood days. As kids we all loved to play, whether it was playing indoors with toys or going out to tumble in the grass and catch that imaginary butterfly or vanquish the make believe dragon.
Over the years, research has proved that, play has always been underestimated. The benefits of play go beyond just spending time with friends and having fun. Play, in fact, is associated with a lot of developmental activities, including neural development, social skills, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, physical skills as well as confidence building and learning to think in abstract terms.
Albert Einstein once said ‘Play is the highest form of research’.

Play Has Many Benefits

  • Play whether it’s indoors with toys and blocks or outdoors, teaches a child how to explore. Explore within him or her and explore the surroundings. A child who is playing is often aware of the environment around and learns to react to situations and surroundings.
  • Play results in higher curiosity levels in children. Have you seen a toddler playing with a box? He or she will try all ways and means to discover what will happen if he or she chews it, bangs it, bites it, tears it or just lets it stand there. This kind of play results in the brain development of the child, teaching it that everything needs to be explored to find out what it can do.
  • Pretend play helps to increase imagination.  When my daughter was four and a half, she pretended she was an engine driver and used to take us around in her ‘train’ Slowly she started questioning us on how engines work, why are some engines connected to a line on the top (she meant electric trains) and so on and so forth. She and her friends would build stories on how an engine wanted to go off the track and move on the road, and how they helped the engine achieve what it wanted to achieve. It was almost like a story teller weaving a story, hearing the kids play and enact the whole drama about the engine!
  • Play enhances self-motivated learning – Play often helps a child to be self-motivated to learn. The child becomes naturally curious, more investigative, questions everything around him/her, and learns not to accept things just as is, but tries and develops an understanding for everything around him/her.
    In short, play is very important for a child’s physical, emotional, social as well as neural development. The more we let a child play and explore the surroundings, the more we are helping in creating an intelligent human who is naturally motivated to achieve success in life.

In short, play is very important for a child’s physical, emotional, social as well as neural development. The more we let a child play and explore the surroundings, the more we are helping in creating an intelligent human who is naturally motivated to achieve success in life.

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